Calls for lower drink drive limit backed by Cambridgeshire PCC

Cambridgeshire Police Crime Commissioner Sir Graham Bright ENGEMN00120130816140004
Cambridgeshire Police Crime Commissioner Sir Graham Bright ENGEMN00120130816140004

A lower drink drive limit to reduce the number of people killed on our roads is being backed by Cambridgeshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner.

Sir Graham Bright was one of nine police and crime commissioners backing a private members bill which has been debated in the House of Lords which would lower the drink driving limits in England and Wales.

The bill, sponsored by Lord Brooke of Alverthorpe, would reduce the current limits from 80mg alcohol/100ml blood to 50mg alcohol/100ml blood – in line with most other European countries.

England and Wales currently has the highest allowed levels in Europe.

Sir Graham, said: “The consequences of incidents caused by drink drivers can be catastrophic resulting in life changing injuries or even death. It is the emergency services that have the terrible task of dealing with the aftermath.

“Alcohol affects driving ability and the current limits are too generous and should be reduced.

“Scotland has led the way on alcohol policy having introduced a lower drink drive limit in late 2014. I am urging parliament to make similar changes for England and Wales.

“A lower drink drive limit will help reduce the numbers of people dying or suffering life changing injuries on the roads – and ultimately make our communities safer.”

In a letter of support, sent to Lord Brooke, the PCCs write: “All available evidence suggests that a lowering of the current drink-drive limit in England, Wales and Northern Ireland from 80mg alcohol/100ml blood to 50mg alcohol/100ml blood would improve road safety and save hundreds of lives.

“The human cost of drink driving is far too high and we welcome any measures that could help to reduce it.

“We must also recognise the impact that drink driving has on our emergency services.

“The Local Government Association’s estimate that lowering the current drink-drive limit to 50mg would save almost £300 million annually by reducing the number of call-outs to accidents and the associated public sector costs of police, ambulances, and hospital admissions. This is funding that could be reinvested into helping keep our communities safe.”