Development spoiling March

Letters from the Fenland Citizen, fenlandcitizen.co.uk, @FenlandCit on Twitter
Letters from the Fenland Citizen, fenlandcitizen.co.uk, @FenlandCit on Twitter

March, generally described as a pleasant, unhurried, market town, moves steadily towards spoilation.

Large housing projects are bringing this to fruition. Berryfields, Gaul Road and Elliott Road housing developments will ensure the town centre bottle-necked by the bridge and a very busy junction will be anything but pleasant.

The infrastructure will become less able to cope with the inevitable increase of traffic.

This is also a potential threat to business emphasised by the proposed development of retail premises at the town’s perimeters.

March could well benefit from new shops, therefore why not make use of Ogden’s disused site which is very convenient to the High Street and central car park?

As regards the existing traffic build-up fueled by Broad Street’s T-junction linked to Creek Road and Station Road in the near vicinity, I think it is time that the traffic lights at the junction in Broad Street with new traffic lights at Station Road/Creek Road junction be synchronised with the intention of speeding up traffic movement.

Existing infrastructure cannot be altered and a longer period of movement is necessary, especially with regards to a greater influx of traffic which is bound to happen with many more houses being built.

Trevor Bevis,

March.

housing needs

Crisis here

Like stages of grief, the London housing market has come through denial and bargaining and has moved into the sixth start: The new £15bn housing project in Battersea, where flats start at £602,000. It has planning permission for a 25-metre swimming pool that literally looks down on the rest of London. The “sky pool” will be suspended between two tower blocks 10 storeys high, have a transparent floor and be the most expensive metaphor since.

Something has changed in the housing crisis. The goalposts have not moved so much as exploded. Chuckling at the madness and obscenity we see with our own eyes, last month London’s first “fashion-branded” skyscraper went on sale in Vauxhall.

Studios from £711,000. Buyers of property in the Aykon Tower will, the literature promises, “live the complete Versace lifestyle, a fantasy turned into reality”. On the 23rd floor buyers will find a pool and spa, as well as a private cinema. Parking spaces are £50,000.

With that sky pool, though, could they have been any clearer with their message of “screw you, peasants”.

Our metaphors here in Fenland are virtually extinct. Again and again housing associations are failing their targets, it’s been nearly eight years since Roddons took over our council houses and they have yet to reach their “target of 500 houses within five years” – London having a laugh at the rest of the country.

It is no wonder that Jeremy Corbyn will prompt a national council house building programme when, and if, he became leader. I wonder if our housing providers are listening or even have the slightest vague idea of the housing crisis in Fenland.

John White,

Wisbech.

labour leadership

Nonentity?

In response to David Silver (Readers’ Views, September 2). He called Jeremy Corbyn a “nonentity” then went on to say that “most politicians are” – which sort of cancels out the claim against Corbyn.

Is he a “nonentity” amongst nonentities? Clearly not since he stands out and is commanding venues of thousands of interested members of the public all over Britain.

As for David’s “useful idiot” description. He aligns this to a group, faction ideology – Marxism. David, if you look deep into past political events you will find the top banks and politicians willingly worked with Marxists and Marxism in order to ferment a money-making booster to capitalism.

One could cite many contradictions with modern politics – Clegg, Miliband and the biggest culprit of them all, Tony Blair. Jeremy Corbyn can never be associated with them nor contradictions of policy. That is why he is so interesting and so highly supported.

People are fed up with the mushiness and patronising attitude from the two Tory parties – NEW Labour Blairites and Cameron’s management group.

If you want welfare reform at the expense of the less well-off, vote Tory. If you are against this – who do you vote for, because Burnham, Kendall and Cooper are proud of having the exact same policy as the Tories. Anyone who can, in all honesty, watch them and conclude they have anything to offer must be in cloud cuckoo land. They are the personification of a nonentity.

John Bennett-Collins,

via e-mail,

full details supplied.