Barrier plea to crackdown on Outwell flytipping plague

Pile of tyres in Back Lane, Outwell.
Pile of tyres in Back Lane, Outwell.

Residents fed-up with flytipping in a West Norfolk village are prepared to dip their hands in their own pockets to help tackle the issue once and for all.

People living in Outwell want barriers to prevent unauthorised vehicular access installed in Back Lane – and will help pay towards the cost.

Flytipping in Back Lane, Outwell.

Flytipping in Back Lane, Outwell.

The lane has been blighted by flytipping problems for more than a year, but parish, borough and county councils say they are unable to act as its on private land.

There are huge piles of tyres dumped on the side of the lane and in dykes, furniture and rubbish, and following Storm Doris last month, there are now black bin bags filled with broken roof tiles.

One resident, who did not wish to be named, said: “Flytippers are ruining the village. and the problem is getting worse. I’ve contacted the parish, borough and county councils but they all say they can’t do anything as it’s private land.

“They ought to just clear it and find out who owns the land later.”

The resident said it was not possible to flytip in Back Lane without the use of a vehicle, so the installation of access barriers would solve the problem.

“The residents round here would even contribute towards the cost if the land owner said they’d do it,” she said.

West Norfolk Council said flytipping on private land is a “major issue”, which can cost landowners thousands of pounds to clear.

It also said local authorities can only clear flytipping on public land.

Councillor Ian Devereux, the council’s Cabinet member for environment, added: “Flytipping is not a victimless crime. If it happens on public land it ultimately costs the tax payer to clear it up. If it happens on private land, then the landowner has to pay.

“We will and do assist landowners who report fly tips to us and will, where evidence is strong enough, prosecute offenders. Whilst we will do what we can to investigate and prosecute flytippers, householders and businesses can also help by making sure they take responsibility for disposal of any waste they create.”