I blame police, courts and the Eurocrats

Letters from the Fenland Citizen, fenlandcitizen.co.uk, @FenlandCit on Twitter

Letters from the Fenland Citizen, fenlandcitizen.co.uk, @FenlandCit on Twitter

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The UKIP van was in Wisbech Market Place on Wednesday, October 15.

The police were also present –perhaps thinking there might be trouble.

Living in Wisbech I am well aware of the number of East Europeans and the changes to the town because of large scale immigration. But look around and you can see shops and businesses run by East Europeans all presumably paying local business rates and taxes to the government and collecting VAT for the government. This is not the place to have a go at immigration.

Rather UKIP should park outside police headquarters and government offices and possibly the courts – for these are the organisations who have failed us.

I am sure East Europeans just like us don’t want drunks and scroungers and criminals from their own countries here.

The police arrest a suspect and fail to check his background; the courts fail to remove undesirables and often give them non-punitive sentences.

Whatever diktat from Brussels comes through not only do our civil servants apply it with alacrity, they augment it.

I don’t look to blame the migrants. To be honest Britain has always welcomed new blood and it has worked well for us.

My strongest resentment falls fair and square on the EU and its bureaucrats, so in that I agree with UKIP.

I sometimes think that these EU officials are out to get us, to seriously undermine our way of life and neuter us.

I think they resent Britain because Britain has always stood firm against a sea of troubles when their own countries have capitulated. But UKIP’s approach is equally as distasteful when it appears to say to the people passing by their van that we don’t want you – get out!

David Silver,

Wisbech.

CITIZEN

Coverage ‘biased’

I began to feel a need to complain to the Fenland Citizen as I worked my way through the October 22 edition.

Admittedly it wasn’t until p36, but you hadn’t missed him after all; there was S.Barclay, supporting the NHS.

If the BBC gave this amount of exclusive coverage to opposition politicians, the Tories would soon start screaming “Bias!”

Tony Beedham,

March.

ARTHRITIS

Thanks to all Pain Killers

On behalf of Arthritis Research UK and people living with arthritis I would like to thank everyone who Became a Pain Killer during National Arthritis Week (October 12-19).

Arthritis holds 10 million people in the grip of excruciating pain, including myself. This pain can be invisible and too often dismissed as minor aches and pains. However, in reality, arthritis is the biggest cause of pain and disability in the UK, affecting people of all ages.

Arthritis Research UK believes everyone has a right to live a pain-free life. This year the charity highlighted the impact of pain and asked you to Become a Pain Killer either for yourself or a loved one to help win the battle against arthritis.

Many of you did this by completing the National Arthritis Survey, finding more about pain management or attending a fundraising event.

I became a Pain Killer for myself, while my husband and children all became a Pain Killer for me.

The pain of arthritis can make everyday tasks that many people take for granted extremely difficult. My husband helps me shower, get dressed and helps with the cooking. I can no longer do the things I used to love and at 34 it’s hard to come to terms with it.

I’m proud to support Arthritis Research UK as they are dedicated to stopping the devastating impact that arthritis has on people’s lives by funding life-changing research.

I’m certain that one day they will find a cure and people with arthritis, like me, won’t have to live with this invisible pain. However, the charity’s work will not be possible without the public’s continued support.

National Arthritis Week may be over but, if you live with arthritis like me, there’s still time to fill out the National Arthritis Survey which will help the charity understand the disease and its effects on people’s everyday lives.

You can also read and share their information on living with pain, or host a fundraising event.

However you choose to support Arthritis Research UK, together we’ll be one step closer to finding a cure.To find out more about the work of Arthritis Research UK please visit: www.nationalarthrtisweek.org

Catherine Manning,

34-years-old

living with arthritis.