Mammoth tusk and wooly rhino bones found in March

Fossils Galore March'Sarah Moore and Jamie Jordan, with bones from a Mammoth and Woolly Rhino ANL-151109-083502009
Fossils Galore March'Sarah Moore and Jamie Jordan, with bones from a Mammoth and Woolly Rhino ANL-151109-083502009

A mammoth tusk and leg bones from a rare woolly rhino are among the finds which have been coming out of Fenland soils.

Fossils Galore museum owner Jamie Jordan has enjoyed a fantastic four-week period of uncovering bones from these amazing creatures, which once roamed the area.

He has discovered a tusk and shoulder blades from different mammoths.

And it also hoped that the museum could eventually have a complete skeleton from a rare woolly rhino.

Woolly rhinos were large mammals which had two horns and were covered in thick fur.

Last year Jamie found the skull of a juvenile rhino, which was close to becoming fully grown, and has also discovered leg bones.

He said: “It is always mind-blowing when you discover something like this. It’s like a birthday.

“It is always a fantastic feeling to come across something which has been in the ground for thousands of years.

“This area is really important as the bones are well preserved.

“A woolly rhino skeleton was found in Suffolk and that is 60 per cent complete, so we are catching up.

“Hopefully we will find the rest of the skeleton which will mean we will be able to confirm how the animal died.”

The skull was found in a field in the March area in November last year.

Mr Jordan and his team have discovered that the animal was probably killed by another rhino.

And marks found on the bones have show that Stone Age man had been scavenging from the skeleton.

Over the last few weeks, he has found three leg bones, a tooth and a couple of vertebrae.

He discovered the two feet long mammoth tusk at a site around March. Earlier in the month he had found two large shoulder blades, a jaw bone and teeth from another mammoth.

Mr Jordan has also found some interesting marks on the bones.

He said: “Elephants roll bones when they are in mourning.

“We have found heavy cut marks in the bones which I believe is an example of this.”

Last week, Mr Jordan completed a live feed over the Facebook page.