Volunteers open new pathway to Wisbech General Cemtery

Wisbech General Cemetery new entrance opening, guests and those involved raise a glass at the opening ceremony, far left is David Crouch (Tres Wisbech Society) and front centre, Sue Beel (Chair of the Wisbech General Cemetery) who cut the tape to officially open the entrance ANL-141010-193720009

Wisbech General Cemetery new entrance opening, guests and those involved raise a glass at the opening ceremony, far left is David Crouch (Tres Wisbech Society) and front centre, Sue Beel (Chair of the Wisbech General Cemetery) who cut the tape to officially open the entrance ANL-141010-193720009

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Residents and visitors are able to fully admire a Wisbech chapel now an eyesore has been removed.

Wisbech General Cemetery’s chapel was hidden behind a derelict plumber’s yard in North End for many years.

But now – thanks to the efforts of volunteers – the chapel and the cemetery can now be fully appreciated.

Friends of Wisbech Cemetery and Wisbech Society have been working hard to create the new Lambert’s Walk entrance to the site.

Chairman of the Friends group, Sue Beel, performed the opening by cutting a ribbon to the new entrance during a short ceremony.

Treasurer David Crouch said: “We have been told that this is a huge improvement to the area.

“The work has made the area look much better and people can now see the chapel in all its glory from the road.

“The existing entrance to the cemetery is around the back and people did not know what existed at the end of it.

“This is the culmination of two years of work.”

The society purchased the former builder’s yard which was then demolished to create the pathway.

A variety of materials have been donated to the project.

The path has been named after Basil Lambert, who was a benefactor for the town and the society.

The name is rather fitting as Mr Lambert, who died in the 1990s, was the last person to be buried at the cemetery.

The society is now working on a bid to restore the former chapel. Members need an estimated £200,000 to transform the neglected chapel into a community and education centre.