Wind turbines

0
Have your say

I NEVER thought I would see anything like it in my life time. The march of wind turbines gathers apace often lending negative views to the eye and, astoundingly so in areas of acclaimed beauty, uniqueness and impact of historical interest.

Grouse moors, undulating hill sides, inspiring downs overlooking scenes of abiding beauty. The flat lands and the mountains. Even the sea cannot escape the monstrosities that are making Britain resemble a pin cushion.

Plenty has been said about the small amount generated by wind turbines. Not enough has been said about the fiscal attraction of having a wind farm on your land.

To me and countless others these much vaunted contraptions serve largely to blight our (once) green and pleasant land by proliferation in the name of riches.

Land owners visualise wind farms as a means of accumulating a lot of money from government subsidies taken from you and me in the guise of green taxation.

I emphasise with the sentiments of John Stoneman in his concern for the safety of wildlife, which in this case frequent the Wash reserves of the RSPB and wildlife and Wetland Trust.

In America it was recently reported that wind farms are destroying countless birds in flight and from this fact authorities should learn that erecting turbines on or near flight paths of migratory creatures is not on. Why are so many wind farms being built in Britain? The answer is glaringly obvious. They are the means of making the wealthy wealthier from government appointed agencies.

In truth £350,000 is an average figure paid out in subsidies from the pockets of the country’s taxpayers for the siting of just a few wind farms. Imagine the total amount paid out against the sitting of, at present, 5,000 wind turbine struggling to find sufficient wind. Many more are to come. Site owners are enriched by the chancellor and that is the main reason more and more are springing up in the land and in our unique Fens.

How far do the subsidies reach? I cannot help but think that council departments benefit from saying “Yes” to speculators of this kind.

Before lights begin being turned off, it is important to follow the trend of many modern countries and invest in direct nuclear energy. The sooner the better.

TREVOR BEVIS

March