Peacock ruling out Rio Olympics

Great Britain's Jonnie Peacock celebrates winning Gold during the Men's 100m - T44 Final at the Olympic Stadium, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday September 6, 2012. See PA story PARALYMPICS Athletics. Photo credit should read: Lynne Cameron/PA Wire
Great Britain's Jonnie Peacock celebrates winning Gold during the Men's 100m - T44 Final at the Olympic Stadium, London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday September 6, 2012. See PA story PARALYMPICS Athletics. Photo credit should read: Lynne Cameron/PA Wire
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PARALYMPIC 2012 T44 100m champion Jonnie Peacock (pictured) has played down his prospects of competing in the Rio 2016 Olympics.

The 19-year-old said it would be unrealistic to face the best able-bodied sprinters in the world like Usain Bolt, who won two gold medals at London 2012, adding: “The first 40 [metres] is going to be too slow and there’s not enough time to make it back up.

“Never say never, but it would be a lot harder because of the disadvantage at the start.”

Peacock already trains with able-bodied athletes, and this summer he has bonded with the likes of London 2012 long jump gold medallist Greg Rutherford, who had given high profile support to the Doddington sprinter in the build-up to his career-defining race on Thursday.

When he was five years old Peacock contracted meningitis resulting in the disease killing the tissues of his right leg. His leg had to be amputated below the knee.

Like many Paralympians, the teenager makes light of it: “I wish I could say it was from a shark attack, or something like the others at these Games!”

Peacock appeared on the Last Leg, the Paralympics late night TV show hosted by amputee and comedian Adam Hills.

He was asked why he demonstrated to the crowd to request some silence after the mass chants of “Peacock, Peacock,” even going as far as miming “Sshhh” and waving his arms down.

Peacock replied: “I felt for the other athletes. I didn’t want any excuses at the end of the race.”

This was surely a humorous reference to the finish of Pistorius’s defeat by Alan Oliveira in the final of the 200m when the South African accused Oliveira’s blade of being too long.

In contrast Peacock said Pistorius – the gold medal winner in the 2008 Beijing Games – was more humble when losing this time around, telling Peacock after his T44 triumph: “He said: ‘I told you you’d do it’.

“He was really gracious in defeat this time.”