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Cambridgeshire people make use of Sarah's Law



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More than 130 people have applied for information from Cambridgeshire Police through the Sarah's Law legislation in the last year.

The law was introduced following the abduction and murder of eight-year-old Sarah Payne in Sussex in 2000, and followed a pilot scheme of which Cambridgeshire Police was a part.

It came into force in England and Wales in 2011 and is named after Sarah, who was abducted and murdered by a convicted paedophile.

Sarah Payne had a law named after her which allows families to check whose living in their area and might pose a threat to children. (56190013)
Sarah Payne had a law named after her which allows families to check whose living in their area and might pose a threat to children. (56190013)

The law allows people to find out whether a convicted paedophile or rapist is living on their street.

Anyone can ask the police to check whether people who have contact with their child or children pose a risk.

If the person has convictions for sexual offences against children or poses a risk of causing harm, the police can choose to disclose this information confidentially to the parent, carer or guardian, but disclosure is not guaranteed.

Previously, a parent could raise concerns about someone, but there were no clear rules about whether or not they should be told anything if officers discovered cause for concern.

Police can also warn parents if concerns are raised by grandparents or neighbours.

Sarah's killer Roy Whiting had a previous conviction for abducting and sexually assaulting an eight-year-old girl and had served four years in jail he was living just 15 minutes away from Sarah was taken.

After Sarah's murder he was jailed for life with a 40 year minimum term

To find out more visit the force's website: https://orlo.uk/EcQcx



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