Nature’s fantastic light show

jpwm-12-10-13-009 travel Northern lights''Undated Handout Photo of Northern Lights display over the frozen Baltic Sea in Lulea, Sweden. See PA Feature TRAVEL Sweden. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Renato Granieri. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature TRAVEL Sweden. ENGPPP00120131010145443
jpwm-12-10-13-009 travel Northern lights''Undated Handout Photo of Northern Lights display over the frozen Baltic Sea in Lulea, Sweden. See PA Feature TRAVEL Sweden. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Renato Granieri. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature TRAVEL Sweden. ENGPPP00120131010145443

Aurora Borealis, or the Northern Lights, is truly a sight to be seen.

This natural light phenomenon most visible in the skies of Norway, comes from the Latin word ‘aurora’ meaning ‘sunrise’, or the Roman goddess of dawn.

The aurorae are caused by cosmic rays, solar wind and magnetospheric plasma interacting with the atmosphere. The result is a spectacular array of beautiful, glowing colours, dancing across the night sky.

A sighting is not always guaranteed though; the Northern Lights can be quite elusive, with poor weather conditions being the main hindrance. It is worth a trip though, as the experience as a whole can be once in a lifetime.

We’ve just passed the solar maximum, making displays between September and March much more likely for the next year or two, but to increase your chances even more, travel during dates which avoid a full moon and visit more remote locations, away from light pollution.

The Lights are predominantly seen in the Arctic region and Norway is not the only country where you can witness the show. Tourists can also visit Sweden, Finland, and even Canada.

There are a variety of options to get you a front seat view of the light show in Norway. Choose to cruise around the Arctic, or be led on a thrilling husky sled experience.

For something a little more different, this alternative will take you off from an airport of your choice on a round-trip flight above the cloud layer and up towards the Arctic Circle and with a bit of luck, you’ll get the full Aurora Borealis treatment.

This exhilarating passage will also treat you to an amazing blanket of stars in the night sky, plus you can also get a pre-flight illustrated presentation and expert information from guest in-flight astronomers.

The return journey will soon have you back to the comfort of your own home as the flight lasts approximately three hours from your chosen airport. The flight in search of the Northern Lights is sure to make a change from your usual evening out and a very romantic option indeed.

If travelling in the colder seasons, be sure to pack layers of winter clothes as if you were going skiing, including gloves, a hat, scarf and ear muffs!