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Owen Green a former prisoner of war from Wisbech has celebrated his 100th birthday



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The secret to a long life according to Owen Green who celebrated his 100th birthday on Saturday (8) is hardwork - but a beer with every meal could help too.

Owen Green celebrating his 100th birthday. (5877531)
Owen Green celebrating his 100th birthday. (5877531)

Mr Green, who lives with his only son Raymond in Wisbech, was the eldest son of Maud and Joseph Green, and as he sheepishly admits he was “born out of wedlock - but they did eventually marry”. As a result he spent some of his early life living with his grandparents.

Owen Green who celebrated his 100th birthday on Saturday served with the 61 Field Ambulance - his is pictured front right.
Owen Green who celebrated his 100th birthday on Saturday served with the 61 Field Ambulance - his is pictured front right.

His parents met when they were in service, she working as a servant and he as a farm worker, for the same farming family in Fridaybridge.

Mr Green was born in Coldham but has lived most of his life in South Brink, Wisbech where his parents ran a smallholding at Speedwell Farm, which Mr Green and his younger brother Ian, 80, later took over.

Mr Green also has a younger sister Audrey Newling, 90, of Newton. He said: “My parents had me, then waited 10 years and had my sister and then 20 years after me they had my brother - they seemed to like to a bit of gap between us.”

Owen Green who celebrated his 100th birthday on Saturday served with the 61 Field Ambulance - his is pictured front right.
Owen Green who celebrated his 100th birthday on Saturday served with the 61 Field Ambulance - his is pictured front right.

Mr Green served in the army with the 61 Field Ambulance and was based initially in Malta before being transferred to the Greek Island of Kos where he was captured in 1943 when the Germans invaded.

He spent the rest of the war as a prisoner in Stalag 43 having been transported by cattle truck to Germany. Mr Green had a lucky escape while in the prisoner of war camp as the Americans bombed the nearby marshalling yard and accidentally hit the prison.

“I was buried up to my neck, I looked up and could see my mate and he helped free me - neither of us had a scratch on us, we were really lucky,” said Mr Owen, who married his wartime sweetheart Freda Gill after returning home in 1945.

They lived in South Brink. Sadly Freda died seven years ago at the age of 91.

Mr Owen said his only secret to a long-life was “hard work” but admitted he also enjoys a beer with every meal and has a Pimms before bed.



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