Wisbech man jailed for breaching sex offender rules by returning to Lithuania for four years

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A convincted sex offender who failed to tell the authorities where he was living for six years – including almost four years spent back in his home country – has been jailed today.

Mindaugas Skirmantas, 29, of Lynn Road, Wisbech, was sentenced to a total of 30 weeks’ imprisonment by magistrates in King’s Lynn this morning after admitting two counts of failing to comply with notification requirements.

Passing sentence, presiding magistrate Anna Piggott said the bench had no option but to jail him, partly due to the length of time that he had failed to adhere to the rules.

She added: “There was a deliberate failure to notify the authorities.”

The court was told Skirmantas had been given a one month suspended prison term by the former Fenland magistrates court in December 2008 for sexually assaulting a woman.

Although he subsequently served the custodial element of the sentence, other parts of the punishment, including requirements to inform the police of any changes of address or intent to travel abroad, still remained in force.

But Susannah Chowdhury, prosecuting, said: “There have been two periods of time when he has left the country to return to Lithuania for work reasons, but failed to notify the police.”

The first period began in December 2009, just over a year after his conviction. He then did not return to Britain until November 2013.

The second period began on January 13 this year, before Skirmantas returned on February 3.

When interviewed, Skirmantas told police he understood the notification requirements.

George Sorrell, mitigating, urged the bench to impose a suspended sentence in order to underline the importance of reporting to the police.

He said: “It’s another responsibility. Other people have to do it so there’s no reason why he shouldn’t and he understands that.”

Mr Sorrell said that, while there had been some confusion about the original sentence, his client was “quite honest” with police in accepting he should have informed them of his whereabouts.

He said the breach proceedings which led to his time in prison came as a result of his “work ethic”, which led him to undertake paid work instead of the unpaid work he had been required to do as part of his sentence.

The court also heard Skirmantas had been working seven days a week in a nursery processing flowers while his fiancee, who travelled with him from Lithuania in 2013, is also working.